Sexual rights of young people

Presentation recorded at the World Association of Sexual Health Congress in Prague; May 2017.

Presenter – Tommi Paalanen, Executive Director of the Sexpo Foundation in Helsinki Finland.

“I am a philosopher and a sexologist, whose major interests are in sexual ethics and politics, professional ethics, diversity and commercial sex.”

For more information about Sexpo, which stands for “sex politics” or “sex positive” visit Sexpo’s web site.

Conference “Healthcare + Secularism” Birmingham 27.10.18

Organised by the National Secular Society the conference will present important information on circumcision among other areas where religious practice overrides appropriate medical treatment. For full conference details, list of confirmed speakers and bookings click the image below.

Male and female circumcision are equally wrong

Listen to this excellent interview with philosopher and ethicist Brian Earp on a podcast from the organisation Philosophy 24/7. Click the image to hear the podcast.

Female circumcision is regarded as a violation of a human right. The World Health Organization says “It reflects deep-rooted inequality between the sexes, and constitutes an extreme form of discrimination against women.” But male circumcision, practiced in various cultures and prevalent in various religions, barely generates any controversy. Brian Earp argues that the parallels between the two are much closer than people are usually willing to acknowledge.

Sex education

Sex education for boys is woefully inadequate in the United Kingdom. This statement was clearly demonstrated on the Graham Norton Show (BBC) when it came to light that Sir Patrick Stewart did not know until late in life whether he was circumcised or intact. Please see this report of the program in the Telegraph.


There is a lot of anatomical detail passed down to girls in sex education but virtually none passed down to boys. The problem with anatomical detail and boys is that any discussion of the foreskin and what it is for (it is not just spare skin), will swiftly lead to the undermining of all the usual excuses and justifications given to boys for the removal of their foreskins.  Are sex educators prepared to perpetuate the current myths and poor science that allows society to continue the practice of removing healthy functional tissue from boys’ genitals? Or will sex educators try to move society towards a world where all children are free to grow up with the genitals they were born with?